Talk:Application Guides

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Types of RSS feeds

Timo Laurmaa-BIS 14:19, 18 September 2006 (ADT) The optimal title of a feed item seems to depend heavily on whether the feed is

  • 1 - for specific content only, such as Working Papers, or
  • 2 - a medley of various types of content (eg all new Bank of ABC items)
  • a - provided by the content owner/creator (ie the central bank itself)
  • b - provided by an aggregator such as the BIS or ECB

I am focusing here on RSS "readers" such as Firefox live bookmarks, customized Google search home page etc where you see titles only, no descriptions.

For feeds of type 1, Working Papers would be part of the channel title, thereby making it redundant in the item title and allowing for conciseness, eg 18Sep/Amato: Public and private information.... The user would see from the channel title that Amato's publication is a working paper.

Feeds of type 2 would mix speeches etc with working papers, thereby necessitating a qualifier in the item title, eg 18Sep/WP138 Amato: Public and private information.... The increased challenge is to use concise qualifiers that do not cut off the paper titles completely.

Feeds of type a would have the name of the publishing central bank in the channel title, again making it redundant in the item title and allowing for conciseness, as in the two examples above.

Feeds of type b are aggregated from various sources. The publishing central bank cannot be in the channel title (that shows the aggregator) and must therefore be in the item title. In a type b1 feed the title should then be eg 18Sep/Banca dItalia/Amato: Public and private information... or 18Sep/IT/BdI/Amato: Public and private information... if we use country code and institution abbreviations. A type b2 feed, an aggregated medley, would be a real challenge with something like 18Sep/IT/BdI/WP138 Amato: Public and private information...

Do others see a similar need to have the Application Guide section to be split according to these feed types?